Author’s Toolkit

Nepalese Journal of Neurosciences (NJNS)

Guidance for Authors

Nepalese Journal of Neurosciences (NJNS) is an internationally peer reviewed indexed open access neurosciences journal, an official publication of Nepalese Society of Neurosurgeons (NESON). NJNS presently has following features

  • ISSN print: 1813-1948 ISSN online: 1813-1956
  • Indexed/Archived in Nepal Journals Online, DOAJ, DataCite, Google Scholar, Index Copernicus – World of Journals, Crossref, TDNet
  • Each article gets unique DOI number
  • Creative Common license (CC) copyright
  • Published three times in a year
  • Double blinded peer reviewed, fast paced processing and open free access
  • No publication charge to authors
  • Topics related to Neurosciences not limited to Neurological surgery, Neurology, Neuro psychiatry, Neuro-radiology, Neuro-pathology are all invited as Review articles, Original Articles, Case Reports, Neuro view box, Book Reviews and Letter to editor. We even accept interesting photos for cover page with a short description
  • All articles are archived at http://www.neson.org.np and  http://www.nepjol.info/index.php/NJN 
  • NepJol ONE STAR Journal (JPPS)
  • Index Copernicus Value (ICV) 2018: 64.35
  • All authors are required to submit ORCID iDs with their submission (https://orcid.org
  • NJNS abides by:
  1. International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) for Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts, now renamed asRecommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals
  2. World Association of Medical Editors for best editorial practice
  3. Council of Science Editors for best editorial practice
  4. Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) for practicing good publication ethics

 

Before submitting your article, please note

  • The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration.
  • The submission file is in Microsoft Word file (.doc or .docx) format.
  • The text of the manuscript is single-spaced; uses a 12-point font; Time New Roman font, all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed within the manuscript (with captions, legends and descriptions).
  • Provide a website link to all references for PubMed, PMCID, DOI, Full Text (provide all or as much as available).
  • The manuscript should follow Vancouver style of referencing and bibliographic requirement as devised in the NLM style (see at the end or read https://guides.lib.monash.edu/citing-referencing/vancouver)
  • Submit supplementary files along with your manuscript as below
  1. Cover letter
  2. Authorship declaration form
  3. Copyright transfer
  4. Title page
  5. Anonymized manuscript with abstract and key words. Insert page numbers at bottom and mark each line numbers (starting with each page).

Try not to disclose any identify to ensure blind review. With Microsoft Office documents, author identification should also be removed from the properties for the file (see under File in Word), by clicking on the following, beginning with File on the main menu of the Microsoft application: File > Save As > Tools (or Options with a Mac) > Security > Remove personal information from file properties on save > Save. With PDFs, the authors’ names should also be removed from Document Properties found under File on Adobe Acrobat’s main menu.

  1. Patient’s consent for publication (if pictures or details discloses the identity of the patient in the study)
  2. Ethical Approval letter for research article

 

Please consider the following while preparing Manuscripts

  • Abbreviations (Acronyms): Abbreviations should be avoided in abstract. In the main text of the article, abbreviations should be written in brackets along with full form for the first time. Subsequently abbreviation alone may be used. However, standard english abbreviation can be used without its full form. For example: “e.g.” for “example”
  • When starting a sentence with a number, please spell the number. For e.g. “Seventy one percent of subjects had…”
  • When using drug names, generic names should be used. Trade names are not allowed
  • NJNS follows modified Vancouver system as devised in the NLM style (see at the end or read https://guides.lib.monash.edu/citing-referencing/vancouver)
  • Use of Language
    1. Uniformity in Language is required, with preference to British English?
    2. Avoid repetition of same words or waste words.
    3. Do not use ‘&’ and ‘@’ in the text. Please do not write in contractions. For e.g. write “do not” instead of “don’t”.
    4. Running title provided should be not more than 50 characters or 8 words.
  • Rules while using Numbers
    1. Numbers less than 10 should be written in words. For e.g. “was found in two percent”.
    2. Numbers 10 or more should be written in numbers.
    3. Words not numbers should begin a sentence.
    4. Be consistent in lists of numbers.
    5. Do not use a space between a number and its percent sign.
    6. Use one space between a number and its unit.
    7. Do not use percentages if the sample size is less than 20.
    8. Do not imply greater precision than your measurement instrument.
    9. For ranges use “to” but not “–” to avoid confusion with a minus sign
    10. Use the metric system throughout; use of appropriate SI Units is encouraged. If using other, more commonly used units, give the SI equivalent in parenthesis.
  • Images:
    1. Colour: All images should be in colour, except for images which are originally in greyscale e.g. electron microscopy slides or radiological images.
    2. Italicized Caption and Numbering: All images must be numbered as: Figure “number (in Arabic numerals)” with a title describing the image, placed below the image. The caption should read like “Figure 1: Figure title”.
    3. The captions should be placed where the image is meant to be in the manuscript with one line spacing above and below the caption.
  • Tables:
    1. Title and Numbering: Italicized Title of table should be placed below the table. The title should read like “Table 1: Table title“.
    2. Tables, Figure and Images number in Arabic letters (no Romans).
    3. Title/legends provided in no more than 40 words.
    4. For borrowed materials – credit note must be provided in the figure/table/image itself.
    5. Keep the table/figures simple and uncluttered as possible.
    6. Standard abbreviation of units of measurement should be added in parentheses
    7. Use tables to present data that is detailed and that is important.
    8. Avoid tables created with the tab key, pictures, and embedded objects
    9. Fancy borders, shading, 3D effects, multiple grids are both distracting and unnecessary.
    10. Prefer grey shades of tables and figures.
    11. Figures should be simple to interpret, uncluttered, and free of extra lines, text, dimensions and other gimmicks.
    12. Table may be placed within the text of manuscript
  • Graphs/Charts:
    1. Italicized Caption and Numbering: same as Images.
    2. If possible, please send us the graphs/charts as part of Microsoft Worksheet along with the data used to generate the graph/chart.
  • While making references to the tables and figures in manuscript
  1. Refer using Arabic numerals
  2. Point out the relevant part(s) of a table/figure when referring to it.
  3. Do not restate all the information from tables/figures in the text of the paper.
  4. Tables/figures should not be used to highlight what has already been said in the paper.

 

 

Guidelines on individual article types

  • Editorials

It is written by NJNS editors or invited (Guest Editorial) on most pertinent issues on Neurosciences in Nepal or in the world.  It undergoes a fast-track peer review process. 

 

  • Review Articles

Review article summarizes the current state of understanding on a topic and analyses or discusses research previously published by others on the subject matter, rather than reporting new experimental results and which does not fit into the category of systematic review. They are thorough literature reviews that identify historical and current trends in the topic, gaps in the research (areas for further exploration), and current debates or controversies.  It has to be about 3000 words without counting abstract (maximum 250 words) and references (usually >50 but <100). It is recommended that the authors use the ENTREQ guideline for a review of studies that use descriptive data,  MOOSE guideline for a review of observational studies or PRISMA guideline for any other kind of systematic review or meta-analysis.

It undergoes a rigorous yet fast peer review process. 

Required Submission Documents:

  1. Cover letter
  2. Authorship declaration form
  3. Copyright transfer
  4. Title page
  5. Anonymized manuscript with abstract and key words. Insert page numbers at bottom and mark each line numbers (starting with each page). Try not to disclose any identify to ensure blind review

 

  • Original/ Research Article

An original research article should contain 2500-3500 words (excluding the title, abstract, acknowledgements, texts used in tables and graphs, and references). Authors must check the EQUATOR NetworkCONSORT and STROBE sites for any reporting guidelines that apply to the study design and ensure they include any required supporting information recommended by the relevant guidelines. All clinical trials submitted to NJNS must be entered in a publicly accessible registry approved by the WHO or ICMJE. See the list of approved registries.

The manuscript should be written under the following headings:

  1. Title and authorship
  2. Structured Abstract
  3. Introduction
  4. Methods and Materials
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Conclusion
  8. Acknowledgement
  9. References

 

  • Short Communications

Short Communications are short papers that present original and significant material for rapid dissemination, however they do not qualify for full length articles for example pilot study. A Short Communication may focus on a particular aspect of a problem or a new finding that is expected to have a significant impact. Short articles include, but are not limited to: discovery or development of new materials, cutting-edge experiments and theory, novelty in simulation and modeling, elucidation of mechanisms, epidemiological study and outcome analysis.

Authors must check the EQUATOR NetworkCONSORT and STROBE sites for any reporting guidelines that apply to the study design and ensure they include any required supporting information recommended by the relevant guidelines. 

Short Communications are limited to 3000 words and are not subdivided (no subsection is allowed). The paper should contain an abstract, main body and references, and contain no more than 3 figures or tables, combined. The abstract is limited to 100 words. Up to five keywords or short phrases should be given below the abstract.

Short Communications will appear after original article sections in the journal table of contents. Each paper will begin with “Short Communication:” followed by the title.

Required Submission Documents:

  1. Cover letter
  2. Authorship declaration form
  3. Copyright transfer
  4. Title page
  5. Anonymized manuscript with abstract and key words. Insert page numbers at bottom and mark each line numbers (starting with each page). Try not to disclose any identify to ensure blind review
  6. Patient’s consent for publication (if pictures or details discloses the identity of the patient in the study)
  7. Ethical Approval letter

 

  • Case Reports

This section is to bring to notice an unusual finding or unexpected causation or event during treatment or observation, an extraordinary occurrence or outcome of a new procedure or treatment modality or findings that shed new light on the possible pathogenesis of a disease or an adverse effect, unique or rare feature of a disease, unique therapeutic approaches, approaches to a case report, a patient whose diagnosis was difficult to make, describe changes in one or more patients with chronic conditions over an extended time period, report on two or more patients with similar characteristics who received different interventions and had different outcomes, atypical management of patients with common problems, atypical patient presentations, apply theory to patient or client management or report on an administrative or academic experience which can consist of a single or series of cases.

Submission should include a case report with literature review. Use the CARE Case Report Checklist while preparing your case report taking an account of CARE Flow Diagram.

Required Submission Documents:

  1. Cover letter
  2. Authorship declaration form
  3. Copyright transfer
  4. Title page
  5. Anonymized manuscript with abstract and key words. Insert page numbers at bottom and mark each line numbers (starting with each page). Try not to disclose any identify to ensure blind review (using CARE or SCARE reporting guideline)
  6. Patient’s consent for publication (if pictures or details discloses the identity of the patient in the study)
  7. Ethical Approval letter

 

  • Neuro View Box

This section includes interesting but illustrative images, radiological or clinical or intra-operative findings, which should depict a unique finding or association in a commentary of fewer than 1000 words without an abstract. Format of submission should include a brief introduction, clinical scenario and relevant literature review.

Required Submission Documents:

  1. Cover letter
  2. Authorship declaration form
  3. Copyright transfer
  4. Title page
  5. Anonymized manuscript with abstract and key words. Insert page numbers at bottom and mark each line numbers. Try not to disclose any identify to ensure blind review (using CARE or SCARE reporting guideline).
  6. Patient’s consent for publication (if pictures or details discloses the identity of the patient in the study).

 

  • Letter to the Editor 

This section includes any concern or issue relating to NJNS, be it a comment relating a recent article, an elaboration of an important discovery, or simply a thought-provoking commentary of fewer than 1000 words without an abstract.

Required Submission Documents:

  1. Cover letter
  2. Authorship declaration form
  3. Copyright transfer
  4. Title page
  5. Anonymized manuscript with abstract and key words. Insert page numbers at bottom and mark each line numbers (starting with each page). Try not to disclose any identify to ensure blind review

 

 

 

Guidelines for filling supplementary files and preparing the manuscript

  1. Title page with Author Information
  • Title Case; Word after colon (;) beginning with a capital letter
  • The title of the article should be complete, clear, and concise. It should not contain abbreviations.
  • Provide full names with the highest academic degree, designation, affiliation and ORCID iD of all authors.

Example:

Dr. ……………… MCh

Professor, Department of Neurosurgery

Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital

Sinamangal, Kathmandu, Nepal

ORCID iD

 

  • Specify the corresponding author and provide corresponding details which should include:
  • Full name of the corresponding author.
  • Designation and Affiliation.
  • E-mail address.
  • Contact Number:

 

Example:

Address for correspondence:

Dr …………………

Professor, Department of Neurosurgery

Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital

Sinamangal, Kathmandu, Nepal

E-mail:

Contact Number: +977-98……..

 

  1. Structured Abstract with Key words
  • It should summarize the major aspects of the entire content of the paper giving the reader a general idea of your work and your results but avoiding unnecessary details.
  • Word limit: 250 words.
  • Avoid abbreviations in the abstract.
  • References should not be mentioned in abstract.
  • Key Words: 3 to 6 in alphabetical order. Separated by a comma (,) and not ending with a full stop (.)
  • Use words listed in MeSH index [available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.gov/mesh]
  • ‘Key words’ (and not ‘Keywords’ or ‘Key Words’) in the entire issue listed in alphabetical order with each key word capitalised and separated by a comma (,) and not ending with a full stop (.)

 

  1. Introduction
  • It should summarize the current knowledge gap or the need of the study and specify the goals and objective of the study

 

  1. Methods and Materials
  • Information regarding the plan of the study should be included
  • Describe the study design in detail along with the type of study, study duration and study site.
  • The study population should be described in terms of its size, age, gender and other characteristics as required.
  • Sample size with its basis and the sampling method used should be described.
  • Mention the exclusion and inclusion criteria.
  • Depending on the type of study, procedure undertaken for randomization, matching, blinding, etc. should be clearly mentioned. Also mention briefly about important ethical issues such as ethical clearance and informed consent from the subjects.
  • The methodology including the method of data collection should be described in sufficient details such that other workers can reproduce the methods. The materials used in the study should be clearly mentioned (including the manufacturer’s name in parenthesis). If names of drugs, chemicals are to be used, use generic names.
  • Describe how statistical analysis was done and how data was summarised (mean, percentage, etc.). Mention the statistical tests done for measuring statistical significance of the findings. Also mention the statistical software, along with the version, used for data analysis.
  • Mention following, in order of their appearance, and writing in past tense or passive verb
  • Study type and study design
  • Place and duration of study
  • Sample size and Sampling method
  • Methods of data collection
  • Ethical Approval and Patient consent
  • Inclusion and exclusion criteria
  • Protocols followed (if any)
  • Statistical analysis and software used

 

 

  1. Results

The results section should contain the key findings of your study in logical order without any

interpretation of the data. The data may be illustrated in appropriate tables and graphs. If findings have been documented in tables, do not repeat it in the text. While giving your results, mention not only the derivatives of your results (e.g. percentage) but also the absolute numbers you derived from your study. Specify the method of statistical analysis and its outcome (p-value, confidence interval).

 

  1. Discussion

The discussion section should describe the relevance and interpretation of your results.

– Organize it according to the sequence in which your results are mentioned.

– Emphasize only important and new findings from your study and do not repeat all your results. Make sure the objectives of your study are addressed by your interpretation of results.

– For experimental studies, it is useful to begin the discussion by summarizing briefly the main findings, then explore possible mechanisms or explanations for these findings, provide references to compare and contrast the results with other relevant studies, state the limitations of the study, and explore the implications of the findings for future research and for clinical practice.

 

  1. Conclusion

The conclusion section should include the interpretation of your results in link to your objectives. Do not deviate from the objectives and do not include statements and conclusions not supported by your results. Do not claim priority and do not allude to work in progress.

 

  1. References

– In modified Vancouver system (as adapted by the NLM in Citing Medicine). (https://guides.lib.monash.edu/citing-referencing/vancouver)

 

 

NLM / Vancouver Style 

 

Created in 1978 by a group of Medical Journal Editors (which later evolved into International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, ICMJE), Vancouver style refers to the detailed style of citation and referencing. Since 2007, the ICMJE has referred to the detailed style guide from the National Library of Medicine, Citing Medicine, for formatting citation. Please follow the version below for NJNS. (For help, read https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK7256/)

 

IN-TEXT CITATIONS

NJNS accepts the following system of in-text citations.

  • citation-sequence
    • In text, Arabic numerals (as superscripts) are used to refer to the work in the reference list, in the order in which it is cited in the text, placed immediately after the text which refers to the source being cited.
    • Reference numbers should be inserted to the left or inside of colons and semi-colons but outside or after full stops and commas.
    • If you are citing more than one references, list each reference number separated by a comma, or by a dash for a sequence of consecutive numbers but do not give any space between commas or dashes.
    • You can use the author’s name in your text, but you must insert the citation number as well.
    • If a work has more than one author and you want to cite author names in your text, use ‘et al.’ after the first author
    • When citing work from a book, the author who wrote the chapter should be cited, not the editor of the book.
    • In reference list, list references in the order they first appear in the text

 

REFERENCE LIST

References are listed in Arabic numerical order, and in the same order in which they are cited in text. The reference list appears at the end of the paper. See Citing Medicine for a full list of citation formats and examples.

  • BASIC ARTICLE FORMAT:
  • Abbreviate journal titles in the style used in the NLM Catalog
  • Enter author’s surname followed by no more than 2 initials.
  • If more than 1 author: give all authors’ names and separate each by a comma and a space.
  • For articles with 1 to 6 authors, list all authors. For articles with more than 6 authors, list the first 6 authors then add ‘et al.’
  • Only the first word of the article title and words that normally begin with a capital letter are capitalized.
  • Journal titles are abbreviated (to find correct abbreviations see: PubMed Journals Database
  • Follow the year of publication with a semi-colon;
  • Give the volume number (no space) followed by issue number in brackets
  • If the journal has continuous page numbering through its volumes, omit month/issue number.
  • Abbreviate page numbers where possible, e.g.: 123-29.
  • The digital object identifier (DOI) is a unique identifier, and should be provided in the reference where it is available, for example https://doi.org/10.13003/5jchdy rather than DOI: 10.1037/a0024996. This alphanumeric string is usually located on the first page with other referencing elements in the article. More recent electronic journal articles will be displayed as permanent URL’s.
  • Some examples
    • Journal Article

Halpern SD, Ubel PA, Caplan AL. Solid-organ transplantation in HIV-infected patients. N Engl J Med. 2002;347(4):284-7.

  • Journal Article (more than 6 authors)

Rose ME, Huerbin MB, Melick J, Marion DW, Palmer AM, Schiding JK, et al. Regulation of interstitial excitatory amino acid concentrations after cortical contusion injury. Brain Res. 2002;943(1):15-22.

  • Journal Article (organization as author)

Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group. Hypertension, insulin, and proinsulin in participants with impaired glucose tolerance. Hypertension. 2002;40(5):679-86.

  • Online Journal Article
  •  The word [Internet] in square brackets should be inserted after the abbreviated journal title.
  •  The date cited [in square brackets] must be included after the date of publication.
  •  The URL (web address) must be included at the end of the reference.
  • For electronic journal articles with a DOI, include the DOI (digital object identifier) at the end of the reference, after the URL

Kanneganti P, Harris JD, Brophy RH, Carey JL, Lattermann C, Flanigan DC. The effect of smoking on ligament and cartilage surgery in the knee: a systematic review. Am J Sports Med [Internet]. 2012 Dec [cited 2013 Feb 19];40(12):2872-8. Available from: http://ajs.sagepub.com/content/40/12/2872 https://doi.org/10.1177/0363546512458223

 

  • BASIC BOOK FORMAT:
    • Book
    • Author AA. Title of book. # edition [if not first]. Place of Publication: Publisher; Year of publication. Pagination.
    •  Author AA. Title of web page [Internet]. Place of Publication: Sponsor of Website/Publisher; Year published [cited YYYY Mon DD]. Number of pages. Available from: URL DOI: (if available)

 

Murray PR, Rosenthal KS, Kobayashi GS, Pfaller MA. Medical microbiology. 4th ed. St. Louis: Mosby; 2002.

 

  • Book Chapter
  • Author AA, Author BB. Title of chapter. In: Editor AA, Editor BB, editors. Title of book. # edition. Place of Publication: Publisher; Year of publication. p. [page numbers of chapter].
  • Author AA, Author BB. Title of chapter. In: Editor AA, Editor BB, editors. Title of the book [Internet]. Place of publication: Publisher’s name; Year of publication. [cited YYYY Mon DD]. p. #. [page or chapter number/s]. Available from: URL DOI [if available]

 

Neuman WL. Social research methods: qualitative and quantitative approaches. 6th ed. Boston: Pearson Education; 2006. Chapter 5, The literature review and ethical concerns; p. 110-48.

 

  • Authored Book Chapter

 

Meltzer PS, Kallioniemi A, Trent JM. Chromosome alterations in human solid tumors. In: Vogelstein B, Kinzler KW, editors. The genetic basis of human cancer. New York: McGraw-Hill; 2002. p. 93-113.

 

 

Harnden P, Joffe JK, Jones WG, editors. Germ cell tumours V. Proceedings of the 5th Germ Cell Tumour Conference; 2001 Sep 13-15; Leeds, UK. New York: Springer; 2002.

 

  • WEBSITE BASIC FORMAT
    • Author/organization’s name. Title of the page [Internet]. Place of publication: Publisher’s name; Date or year of publication [updated year month day; cited year month day]. Available from: URL
    • Title of the homepage [Internet]. Place of publication: Publisher’s name; Date or year of publication. Title of specific page/part; Date of publication of part [Date cited of part]; [location or pagination of part]. Available from: URL

 

Diabetes Australia. Diabetes globally [Internet]. Canberra ACT: Diabetes Australia; 2012 [updated 2012 June 15; cited 2012 Nov 5]. Available from: http://www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/en/ Understanding-Diabetes/Diabetes- Globally/  

 

Australian Medical Association [Internet]. Barton ACT: AMA; c1995-2012. Junior doctors and medical students call for urgent solution to medical training crisis; 2012 Oct 22 [cited 2012 Nov 5]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://ama.com.au/media/junior-doctors -and-medical-students-call-urgent- solution-medical-training-crisis  

 

GOVERNMENT AND OTHER REPORTS

  • Where the author is an organization, quote the full name of the organization, omitting the word “The” if preceding the name.
  • Where an author and organization are cited, use the author’s name.
  • If there are no authors, only editors, list all editors, followed by a comma and the word editor(s)
  • Author AA, Author BB. Title of report. Place of publication: Publisher; Date of publication. reports Total number of pages. Report No.:

 

Rowe IL, Carson NE. Medical manpower in Victoria. East Bentleigh (AU): Monash University, Department of Community Practice; 1981. 35 p. Report No.: 4.

 

Sample Reference List

References

  1. O’Campo P, Dunn JR, editors. Rethinking social epidemiology: towards a science of change. Dordrecht: Springer; 2012. 348 p.
  2. Schiraldi GR. Post-traumatic stress disorder sourcebook: a guide to healing, recovery, and growth [Internet]. New York: McGraw-Hill; 2000 [cited 2006 Nov 6]. 446 p. Available from: http://books.mcgraw- hill.com/getbook.php?isbn=0071393722&template=#toc https://doi.org/10.1036/0737302658  
  3. Halpen-Felsher BL, Morrell HE. Preventing and reducing tobacco use. In: Berlan ED, Bravender T, editors. Adolescent medicine today: a guide to caring for the adolescent patient [Internet]. Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Co.; 2012 [cited 2012 Nov 3]. Chapter 18. Available from: http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/pdf/10.1142/9789814324496_0018
  4. Stockhausen L, Turale S. An explorative study of Australian nursing scholars and contemporary scholarship. J Nurs Scholarsh [Internet]. 2011 Mar [cited 2013 Feb 19];43(1):89-96. Available from: http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.lib.monash.edu.au/docview/858241255?accountid=12528
  5. Kanneganti P, Harris JD, Brophy RH, Carey JL, Lattermann C, Flanigan DC. The effect of smoking on ligament and cartilage surgery in the knee: a systematic review. Am J Sports Med [Internet]. 2012 Dec [cited 2013 Feb 19];40(12):2872-8. Available from: http://ajs.sagepub.com/content/40/12/2872 https://doi.org/10.1177/0363546512458223  
  6. Subbarao M. Tough cases in carotid stenting [DVD]. Woodbury (CT): Cine-Med, Inc.; 2003. 1 DVD: sound, color, 4 3/4 in.
  7. Stem cells in the brain [television broadcast]. Catalyst. Sydney: ABC; 2009 Jun 25.

 

Page Proofs
Page proofs will be sent to the corresponding author once the article is accepted in the final form preferably via email for correction. Authors are encouraged to return the proofs as soon as possible preferably within 48 hours. Failure to return the proofs may result in the delay in the publication of the article.

 

Supplementary Files

Cover Letter
Authorship Declaration Form
Copyright Transfer Form
Title Page
Short Communication
Patient Consent for Publication